SIPS Horticulture Section

As the only horticulture program in the Ivy League, our faculty, staff and students work to shape the food systems and landscapes of today and tomorrow.

Our faculty work across New York to make discoveries and share knowledge about fruits, vegetables and landscape plants. They are called on by farmers, golf course managers, urban foresters, government officials and many others to solve problems around the globe.

If you've ever been shaded by trees on a city street, enjoyed an apple in winter, visited a farmer's market or watched a sporting event on natural grass, then it is likely you have been touched by our work.

Improving our lives with plants

Vegetables

Leafy greens, tomatoes, and squash — our researchers are breeding new varieties and innovating cultivation.

Improving our lives with plants

Fruits

Whether apples, grapes or berries, our researchers are finding innovative strategies for growing the fruit crops central to New York agriculture.

Improving our lives with plants

Ornamental plants

Our researchers are introducing new flower varieties and landscape plants and innovating environmentally sustainable strategies for growing them.

Improving our lives with plants

Urban landscapes

Improving quality of life by enhancing the functions of plants within urban ecosystems.

Improving our lives with plants

Garden-based learning

Engaging and enabling home gardeners and children and adult educators to transform landscapes and lives.

Improving our lives with plants

Turfgrass

Making lawns, sports fields and golf courses sustainable environmental assets.

two people in a field of greens
hands holding apples
poeple standing behind outdoor flower beds
people working on a green area bordering a road
students exploring climate change garden at Cornell Botanic Gardens
group watching robotic mower

Advancing new products and technologies

students with grafted apple plants

Whether building the cider apple industry or breeding fruits and vegetables for regional conditions and markets, our faculty play an important role in supporting New York economic development.

woman in vineyard holding a drone

Our faculty are using cutting-edge tools for imaging and data analysis for precision monitoring of plant growth and health.

man in purple shirt bending over plants

CEA is an advanced and intensive form of hydroponically-based agriculture where plants grow within a controlled environment to optimize horticultural practices.

Graduate and undergraduate training

Horticulture offers degrees and training opportunities at all stages of the educational pipeline.

group of students stnading outside with gardening equipment

Graduate Field of Horticulture

Students interested in obtaining an MS or Ph.D. degree in the graduate field of horticulture can select among four concentrations.

  • Physiology and ecology of horticultural crops
  • Human-plant interactions
  • Breeding of horticultural crops
  • Horticultural crop management systems

Undergrad: Plant sciences major

Undergraduates majoring in the plant sciences can choose to concentrate in one of many areas related to horticulture, preparing them for careers in the green industry, academia and more

Master of Professional Studies

Our MPS programs are one-year, course-based degrees, ideal for individuals interested in in-depth study of the issues and advancements in plant and soil sciences. Choose from specializations in controlled environment agriculture, viticulture, public garden leadership, hemp science, plant protection, geospatial applications and more.

Undergrad research — Summer Research Scholars

The Summer Research Scholars Program for undergraduates is offered by Cornell AgriTech in Geneva, New York. Undergraduate students participate in exciting research projects in one of three disciplines including horticulture.

Undergrad research — more opportunities

The Office of Undergraduate Research provides information about exploring the wealth of research opportunities at Cornell.

The Honors Program in Biological Sciences is designed to offer advanced training in laboratory and field research through the performance of an original research project under the direct guidance of a member of the Cornell faculty.

News from the SIPS Horticulture Section

Learn more about recent developments in our research, outreach and education.

Basil leaves with orange between veins, symptomatic of basil downy mildew

Spotlight

Meg McGrath battles the 'pesto pest' basil downy mildew
Nothing spells disappointment more during pesto-making season than visiting your basil patch only to find your carefully tended crop ravaged. But that is exactly what happened to Meg McGrath, a plant pathologist based at Cornell’s Long Island...
  • School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Horticulture Section
  • Plant Pathology and Plant-Microbe Biology Section
Farmland near Ekwendeni, Malawi

News

Cornell Atkinson has awarded eleven Academic Venture Fund (AVF) seed grants for research by 40 faculty researchers representing eight Cornell colleges and 19 academic departments. The 2021 awards span 11 countries on five continents and many...
  • Cornell Atkinson
  • Department of Global Development
  • Statistics and Data Science
Hops growing on a vine

News

The program – to be led by Larry Smart, professor of horticulture in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences – will integrate AgriTech expertise to help the state’s hops growers overcome breeding and disease-management challenges. Craft...
  • Cornell AgriTech
  • Cornell Craft Beverage Institute
  • School of Integrative Plant Science
Farmers on a tractor planting chickpeas in a field

News

A Schuyler County-Cornell pilot project could help New York farmers diversify their crops and give regional food manufacturers a cost-effective source for the popular legume.
  • Cornell AgriTech
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension
  • School of Integrative Plant Science
Greg Peck with apple tree in background

News

No single organic weed control option works particularly well alone to control weeds in apple orchards during establishment. But strategies combining techniques do work well, particularly using wood chip mulches with organic herbicides. That’s...
  • School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Horticulture Section
  • Organic