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Discover CALS

See how our current work and research is bringing new thinking and new solutions to some of today's biggest challenges.

Purpose-driven science? We literally wrote the book on it.

The first undergraduate textbooks in , and ? Check. The first successful integration of botany and zoology in 1967’s ? Check. A 1925 handbook of that is still a primary resource on the subject? Check.

The research of Cornell CALS scientists, students and staff hasn’t just informed discovery and innovation, but it is also the foundation upon which fields of study have been built. 

We accelerate purpose-driven science by supporting inquiry that crosses disciplinary boundaries and stretches from discovery to invention.

Natural and Human Systems: Social, Physical, and Economic Well-Being; and Sustainable Food, Energy, and Agricultural Resources

The world is complex and intertwined, and bringing global challenges into focus takes more than one lens.

That’s why we focus on three overlapping spheres of inquiry. 

We work relentlessly to understand the systems that drive the human and natural worlds. We do this to promote the well-being of communities and to ensure access to sustainable food, energy and environmental resources.

Because no single discipline is able to address the complex problems facing our communities, CALS researchers collaborate across disciplines.

By working in and across multiple scientific areas, CALS is able to address the challenges and opportunities of the greatest relevance, here in New York, across the nation and around the world.

Plant Science researchers working in a lab.

Opportunities include Andrew W. Mellon Student Research Grants, Arthur Boller Research Fund, Kieckhefer Adirondack Fellowships and Grant Proposal Application Instructions

Biology Scholars Program

Supporting undergraduate diversity in Biological Sciences

Office of Research Development

Assisting faculty at all levels in creating research

students in group
researchers in lab

Did you know?

Explore some of the discoveries that have changed lives and industries.

Disease-resistant Papaya

In the 1990s, he developed the first ever transgenic, disease-resistant papaya which effectively saved Hawaii’s $11 million papaya industry.

Five-kingdom Scheme

He proposed the five-kingdom scheme of classification for organisms in 1969, adding three kingdoms--Monera (bacteria), Protista, and Fungi--to the previous two--animals and plants.

Nine Plant Patents

She holds nine U.S. plant patents: four sweet cherries, one tart cherry, and four apple varieties, including SnapDragon™ and RubyFrost.™

First Molecular Maps

He developed the first molecular maps of both rice and tomatoes.

Red Wine Benefits

He was first to discover that Resveratrol in red wine is beneficial for human heart health.

World's First "Gene Gun"

They developed the world’s first "gene gun", a prototype of which is found in the National Museum of American History.

Latest news, discoveries, and breakthroughs

Explore the work we’re doing today and discover how it’s reshaping tomorrow.

News

NIH-funded research to address rising male infertility
Paula Cohen, associate vice provost for life sciences, is leading an eight-year, $8 million, multi-institution grant to untangle the complex genetic rulebook for how sperm develops.
  • Molecular Biology and Genetics
  • Genetics
  • Medicine
A person sitting at a table and using their phone

News

Mitigating abuses of encrypted social media communication, on outlets such as WhatsApp and Signal, while ensuring user privacy is the focus of a five-year, $3 million NSF grant to a multidisciplinary Cornell research team.
  • Department of Communication
  • Behavior
  • Communication
Rolling Hills

News

From fully autonomous berry harvesters to plant-based lupini bean protein bars, the startups competing for $3 million in prize money at this year’s Grow-NY Food and Agriculture Competition are bringing revolutionary innovations to market.
  • Cornell AgriTech
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension
  • Department of Entomology