Interdisciplinary approaches are needed to sustainably resolve environmental problems. Our visionary faculty and passionate students make this possible at Cornell.

We explore the past, consider the present and plan the future.

We contrast modern and ancient cities, as in this distant view of St. Louis from Monks Mound, central structure of the largest city of the Mississippian culture that prevailed across the eastern U.S. for centuries, prior to European colonization.

We span boundaries between humans and sensitive environments.

We work to understand the capacity for humans to share the earth with the vast diversity of all living things. This sign at the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Complex in coastal California alerts beachgoers to nesting California least terns and Western snowy plovers.

We get our feet wet.

We aim to experience all kinds of environments in all kinds of weather. We are ready to look at what thrives, whether the weather is hot, cold, wet or dry.

We go where decisions are made.

Each year our students meet and work with decision-makers in New York City, Washington D.C., Bonn and throughout the world. Here we meet with Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley.

We explore food security across the globe. 

Food sold in this Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia outdoor market reflects the multiple contrasts of food availability throughout the world.

We examine how cultural practices develop.

This advertisement in Beijing, China was part of a campaign to stop the illegal trade of ivory.

We evaluate restored habitats. 

We examine altered biophysical processes in disturbed landscapes, such as this clear-cut forest in coastal Oregon, along with the economic impact of boom-and-bust natural resource extraction on nearby communities.

We compare inequities associated with environmental degradation.

This sewer outfall in the shadow of the U.S. Capitol highlights the issue of environmental justice and communities that disproportionately experience environmental degradation.

We engage the arts to understand people and their environments.

We use literature, art, music and forms of human expression that impact knowledge and action to reflect upon divergent visions grounded in human imagination, narration, reflection, and persuasion. “Water Dreaming at Kalipinypa” (copyright The Estate of Johnny Warangkula, courtesy of The Aboriginal Artist's Agency) was created by Australian aboriginal artist Johnny Warangkula. This and many other works by Warangkula focused on Kalipinypa, a location where water – a scarce resource in the central Australian desert – gathers after infrequent storms.

Distant view of St. Louis from Monks Mound
Warning sign on beach dune that reads "Do Not Enter"
Students seining river
A group of students in a conference room with Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley.
A woman stands in front of a container of fish at a Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia outdoor market.
Man crosses his arms in an "X" pattern in an advertisement in Beijing against the illegal trade of ivory.
A small hillside covered in harvested timber and protected tree plantings
Warning sign near sewer overflow area in Washington DC
Art by Johnny Warangkula

Environment & Sustainability news

A false color satellite image.

News

$1M NASA grant to improve carbon monitoring in East Africa
The East Africa study area – including Ethiopia, Kenya, Tanzania and Uganda – has experienced deforestation and also contains many large-scale land restoration and land-based climate mitigation programs, but lacks systems for quantifying...
  • Department of Global Development
  • School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Soil and Crop Sciences Section
A mountain with sun streaming in behind it

News

After stifling temperatures parked over the Pacific Northwest in late June, scientists – including Cornell’s Flavio Lehner – said climate change triggered it.
  • Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Planet
  • Climate
Quirine Ketterings standing in front of a poster outside speaking into a microphone

News

The funding aims to help the U.S. dairy industry become carbon neutral while supporting farmers’ livelihoods and will measure greenhouse gas emissions at a working New York dairy.
  • Animal Science
  • Agriculture
  • Planet

Field Note

Multimedia

Cornell atmospheric science student Jacob Feuerstein '23 helped the local National Weather Service office in Binghamton, N.Y., survey and identify a tornado that impacted the nearby town of Dryden, N.Y. Jacob recounts how he identified the tornado, by both watching the radar in real time and embarking on an unofficial survey after the event.
  • Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Environment
  • Nature
A yellow bird sitting on a branch outside singing

Multimedia

News

The free app from Cornell Lab of Ornithology identifies the sounds of more than 400 species from the U.S. and Canada, even when multiple birds are singing at the same time.
  • Lab of Ornithology
  • Animals
  • Environment