Interdisciplinary approaches are needed to sustainably resolve environmental problems. Our visionary faculty and passionate students make this possible at Cornell.

We explore the past, consider the present and plan the future.

We contrast modern and ancient cities, as in this distant view of St. Louis from Monks Mound, central structure of the largest city of the Mississippian culture that prevailed across the eastern U.S. for centuries, prior to European colonization.

We span boundaries between humans and sensitive environments.

We work to understand the capacity for humans to share the earth with the vast diversity of all living things. This sign at the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Complex in coastal California alerts beachgoers to nesting California least terns and Western snowy plovers.

We get our feet wet.

We aim to experience all kinds of environments in all kinds of weather. We are ready to look at what thrives, whether the weather is hot, cold, wet or dry.

We go where decisions are made.

Each year our students meet and work with decision-makers in New York City, Washington D.C., Bonn and throughout the world. Here we meet with Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley.

We explore food security across the globe. 

Food sold in this Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia outdoor market reflects the multiple contrasts of food availability throughout the world.

We examine how cultural practices develop.

This advertisement in Beijing, China was part of a campaign to stop the illegal trade of ivory.

We evaluate restored habitats. 

We examine altered biophysical processes in disturbed landscapes, such as this clear-cut forest in coastal Oregon, along with the economic impact of boom-and-bust natural resource extraction on nearby communities.

We compare inequities associated with environmental degradation.

This sewer outfall in the shadow of the U.S. Capitol highlights the issue of environmental justice and communities that disproportionately experience environmental degradation.

We engage the arts to understand people and their environments.

We use literature, art, music and forms of human expression that impact knowledge and action to reflect upon divergent visions grounded in human imagination, narration, reflection, and persuasion. “Water Dreaming at Kalipinypa” (copyright The Estate of Johnny Warangkula, courtesy of The Aboriginal Artist's Agency) was created by Australian aboriginal artist Johnny Warangkula. This and many other works by Warangkula focused on Kalipinypa, a location where water – a scarce resource in the central Australian desert – gathers after infrequent storms.

Distant view of St. Louis from Monks Mound
Warning sign on beach dune that reads "Do Not Enter"
Students seining river
A group of students in a conference room with Oregon Senator Jeff Merkley.
A woman stands in front of a container of fish at a Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia outdoor market.
Man crosses his arms in an "X" pattern in an advertisement in Beijing against the illegal trade of ivory.
A small hillside covered in harvested timber and protected tree plantings
Warning sign near sewer overflow area in Washington DC
Art by Johnny Warangkula

Environment & Sustainability news

Students pose for a photo holding their awards.

News

Three students win Robinson-Appel Humanitarian Awards
Matthew Borinshteyn ’25, Jennifer Lee ’23 and Avery MacLean ’22 received the 2022 Robinson-Appel Humanitarian Awards in recognition of their significant involvement in community service.
  • Agriculture Sciences Major
  • Natural Resources and the Environment
  • School of Integrative Plant Science
Aerial view of earth

News

Mitigation strategies must target carbon dioxide alongside other largely neglected climate pollutants in order to stay below catastrophic climate tipping points.
  • Department of Global Development
  • Climate Change
  • Environment
Two people sit in a boat on an Adirondack Lake

News

In 1975, New York officially recognized the Brook Trout as the state fish. A favorite of anglers and a symbol of the pristine Upstate wilderness, this species also contributes to New York State’s annual $2 billion freshwater fishing industry...
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension
  • Little Moose Field Station
  • Natural Resources and the Environment
Herd of White-and-black Cows on Grass Field

News

Production of animal protein in China has increased by 800% over the past 40 years, but new research shows why the amount of climate-warming nitrous oxide released from this animal farming has not risen as quickly.
  • Department of Global Development
  • Climate Change
  • Environment
An abstract image of weather.

News

Declaring this the “decisive decade” for climate action, Cornell launched The 2030 Project: A Climate Initiative, which will mobilize world-class faculty to develop and accelerate tangible solutions to the climate challenge.
  • Cornell AgriTech
  • Cornell Atkinson
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension