DiTommaso Lab People

Current lab members

Antonio DiTommaso
Antonio (Toni) DiTommaso

Professor and Section Head

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Antonio (Toni) DiTommaso
Weed ecology and biological weed management
Invasive plant species
Climate change impacts on weed performance and distributions
Marco Esposito in the field with weeds
Marco Esposito

Postdoctoral Fellow (DiTommaso Lab)

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Marco Esposito
  • me422 [at] cornell.edu
Weed ecology and crop-weed interaction
Biological weed management
Plant-plant communication
carrie marschner
Caroline Marschner

Invasive Species Extension Associate (DiTommaso Lab)

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Caroline Marschner
  • cam369 [at] cornell.edu
Weed ecology
Invasive species
Weed identification
scott morris
Scott Morris

Technician (DiTommaso Lab)

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Scott Morris
  • shm9 [at] cornell.edu
Sarah Kezar Headshot
Sarah Kezar

Postdoctoral Associate

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Sarah Kezar
sophie westbrook headshot
Sophie Westbrook

Graduate Student (DiTommaso Lab)

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Sophie Westbrook
  • asw265 [at] cornell.edu
patrick obriant
Patrick O'Briant

Graduate Student (DiTommaso Lab)

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Patrick O'Briant
  • rpo28 [at] cornell.edu
headshot of Natasha Djuric
Natasha Djuric

Graduate Student (DiTommaso Lab)

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Natasha Djuric
  • nd365 [at] cornell.edu
linnea hainich
Linnea Smith

Graduate Student (DiTommaso Lab)

School of Integrative Plant Science

Soil and Crop Sciences Section

Linnea Smith
  • lcs238 [at] cornell.edu

Lab alumni: Where are they now?

Email: kma25 [at] cornell.edu (kma25[at]cornell[dot]edu)

Education

  • 2014 Ph.D., Ecology, Penn State, University Park, PA
  • 2009 M.S., Weed Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2005 B.S., Plant Science (Horticulture), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Fax: 517-353-0890
Email: brainar9 [at] msu.edu (brainar9[at]msu[dot]edu)

  • 2002 Ph.D., Horticulture, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 1993 M.A., Economics, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA
  • 1987 B.A., Economics/Third World Studies, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH

Michigan State profile page

CCE Erie County
21 South Grove St
East Aurora, NY 14052

cell 585-406-3419
email Elizabeth

Research Focus while a Member of Lab

The last time a major survey of problematic agronomic weed species was conducted for the entire United States was in 1992 by Bridges. My main research efforts are to coordinate a survey of troublesome weed species in grain corn, soybean and winter wheat as an update to Bridges (1992) survey for the northeastern United States. The 2011 Northeastern Weed Survey goes beyond simply determining which agronomic weeds are most difficult to control in a particular crop. In this survey, each of the northeastern States is divided into specific climatic zones based on temperature and precipitation levels. When completed, participants will be able to access a contemporary, comprehensive, and fine-scale survey of weed species that are damaging to major U.S. field crops in the northeastern United States.

Research Support Specialist, Horticulture, Cornell University (retired)

Email: bac11 [at] cornell.edu (bac11[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • 1986 M.S., Floriculture and Ornamental Horticulture, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 1979 B.S., Economic Botany, Empire State College, Saratoga Springs, NY

Research Focus

Brian is interested in all aspects of organic crop management. His current project is a comparison of four organic approaches to production of field and vegetable crops. The four systems include: one

modeled on a successful organic farm with outstanding production and weed control; one with a variant on that system (higher nutrient additions in the field crops trial and an intensified cropping system in the vegetable trial); one that is similar to typical practices; and one with an experimental organic reduced tillage system using ridge till culture. The field crops trial also includes a conventionally-managed treatment. Crop yield and quality, insect levels, soil nutrients and health, and weeds are being monitored. The project is set to last for 4 years.

Graduate Student, M.S. Environmental Science & Management, Univ. California, Santa Barbara (UCSB), Sunnyvale, CA

Julia Dagum is a Cornell Presidential Research Scholar and undergraduate research assistant in the Weed Ecology and Management Lab. She is studying agricultural sciences with a concentration in communication,

and is currently assisting in revising the Weeds of the Northeast field guide. She currently hopes to expand her knowledge in weed identification and management, as well her skills in writing and environmental science communication.

Email: dingwei [at] neau.edu.cn (dingwei[at]neau[dot]edu[dot]cn)

  • 1991 B.S., Crop Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, PRC
  • 1997 M.S., Crop Cultivation and Tillage Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, PRC
  • 2004 Ph.D., Crop Cultivation and Tillage Science, Northeast Agricultural University, Harbin, PRC

As a professor at Northeast Agricultural University, I have been teaching courses at the undergraduate and graduate level. At the undergraduate level, I teach a course in pesticide science and at the graduate level I teach a course in weed biology.

My current research is focused on weed biology and integrated weed management strategies in soybean, corn, and rice cropping systems. I also have an interest in assessing the benefits and safety aspects of transgenic crops. Additional research areas of interest include crop-weed competitive interactions, crop rotations and their impact on weed communities, ecology of herbicide-resistant crops and weeds, and herbicide drift.

Email: xg52 [at] cornell.edu (xg52[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • 2009 International Baccalaureate, United World College Costa Rica, Santa Ana, San Jose, Costa Rica
  • 2015 B.S. Agricultural Sciences / B.S. Plant Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

I am doing my honors thesis research under the guidance of Dr. Charles Mohler. My research focuses on how nitrogen and phosphorus additions affect the growth, flowering and biomass production of the weed hairy galinsoga (Galinsoga quadriradiata), both alone and in competition with lettuce (Lactuca sativa). It is known that many important weeds are more responsive to fertilizer than crops, and hence potentially more competitive under fertile conditions; I hypothesize that this is true of hairy galinsoga as well. Understanding the nutrient responses of hairy galinsoga will help growers develop effective strategies for the preventive and cultural management of this weed.

Email: eeh8 [at] cornell.edu (eeh8[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • 2007 B.S., Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Email: ji65 [at] cornell.edu (ji65[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • 2007 Ph.D. (Weed Science and Allelopathy), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • 1997 M.Sc. (Hons.) Agronomy, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • 1995 B.Sc. (Hons.) Agronomy, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan

To study and gain a better understanding of the factors that can aid in managing weeds. Important objectives are to devise effective strategies for weed control that are sustainable and economically viable. Major areas of research interest include: allelopathic weed control, ecological aspects of weed management, and weed control in major field crops in Pakistan.

Email: mcj38 [at] cornell.edu (mcj38[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • 2017 B.S. Student, Biometry and Statistics, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Meghan was an undergraduate research assistant and a Cornell Presidential Research Scholar in the Weed Ecology and Management Laboratory. Meghan's overall research goal is to determine the effects

of climate change in the coming century on the biology/ecology and spread of invasive plant species. Her research focuses on determining the response of the non-native invasive swallow-worts (Vincetoxicum spp.) to projected increases in temperature and CO2 concentration and how these responses may affect their spread in New York State as well as the Northeastern U.S. and southern Canada.

Email: fk226 [at] cornell.edu (fk226[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • Ph.D. Candidate, Department of Agronomy and Plant Breeding, University of Tehran, Karaj, Iran
  • 2008 M.S., Agriculture (Weed Science), University of Tehran, Karaj, Iran
  • 2006 B.S., Agriculture (Plant Protection), University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran

The objectives of my research are to: (1) determine the reproductive growth stage at which three summer annual weeds can be terminated and still produce viable seeds; and (2) quantify the effect of termination method on the viability of weed seeds produced. Three common summer annual weed species: Abutilon theophrasti Medic. (velvetleaf), Chenopodium album L. (common lambsquarters) and Setaria faberi Herm. (giant foxtail) were used in this study. Plants of the three weed species were grown under greenhouse conditions. The flowering phenology of each plant was recorded throughout the experiment. Each species was classified according to four or five developmental stages based on their seed or capsule color or days after flowering (DAF). Three cutting methods were used for each weed species: (a) cutting the entire plant from its base and leaving the plant material to dry on the greenhouse bench, (b) individual capsules (A. theophrasti) or inflorescences (C. album and S. faberi) were harvested and left to dry on the greenhouse bench, and (c) capsules or inflorescences were harvested and seeds tested immediately for germination and viability. After four weeks, capsules or inflorescences from treatments (a) and (b) were transferred to the laboratory for germination and viability testing. For freshly harvested seeds, in treatment (c), seeds within each capsule or inflorescence were divided into three groups so that germination and viability testing and morphological characterization of seeds could be performed. This experiment was repeated in the field during the 2012 growing season. Findings from this research will directly benefit agricultural producers who rely on hand labor or mowing to prevent late-season seed production of summer annual weeds.

Education

  • 2020 B.S., Plant Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2013 B.S. Environmental Resources Engineering and Environmental Biology, SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY
  • 2016 M.S. Environmental Science (Concentration: Ecosystem Restoration), SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry, Syracuse, NY,
  • 2022, PhD., Cornell University, Soil and Crop Sciences, Ithaca, NY

Email: nglittle [at] umn.edu (nglittle[at]umn[dot]edu)

  • 2009-2013 M.S., Weed Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2009 B.S., Human Ecology, College of the Atlantic, Bar Harbor, ME

The broad goal of my research is to improve our understanding of the agroecology of weed-crop competition, particularly the ways weed competition can be minimized by management of nutrient inputs and soil quality. Researchers on Cornell's Organic Cropping Systems Project have observed that as compost application rates increase, the intensity of weed competition also increases. This observation is consistent with other work in the literature. This creates the troubling paradox that, although nutrient additions can improve crop yield if weed control is good, in some cases, the additions promote weed growth and reduce crop yields more than they would have if fertilizer had not been added. The goal of my current research is to elucidate the mechanisms of this relationship. In greenhouse and field experiments I am working on partitioning the effects of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium from composted manure on weed growth and weed-crop competition.

Email: cl2568 [at] cornell.edu (cl2568[at]cornell[dot]edu)

Education

  • 2021 MPS (Agronomy), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2019 B.Sc., (Biochemistry), Old Dominion University, Norfolk, VA

Email: lcm36 [at] cornell.edu (lcm36[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • 2010 M.S., Weed Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2005 B.S., (Honors), Applied Plant Science, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN

Email: julie.major [at] mcgill.ca (julie[dot]major[at]mcgill[dot]ca)

  • 2009 Ph.D., Soil Fertility, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2004 M.S., Weed Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2001 B.S., (Agr) Plant Science Major, McGill University, Montreal, QC
  • 2022 M.P.S., Plant Protection, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2021 M.S., Plant Protection, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia
  • 2019 B.S., Plant Protection, University of Novi Sad, Novi Sad, Serbia

Email: qm35 [at] cornell.edu (qm35[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • 2009 B.Sc. (Hons.) Agronomy, University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • 2011 M.Sc. (Weed Science and Allelopathy), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan
  • 2015 Ph.D. (Weed Science), University of Agriculture, Faisalabad, Pakistan

I have a strong interest in assessing the abundance and diversity of weed seedbanks in different cropping systems and under varying agronomic practices. Ultimately, this research should lead to more effective and sustainable weed management strategies in these systems.

Email: ajm9 [at] cornell.edu (ajm9[at]cornell[dot]edu)

  • 2003 Ph.D., Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 1998 M.S., Crop and Soil Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 1994 B.S., Development Sociology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Visit McDonald's CALS profile page.

Senior Research Associate (deceased April 2021), Soil and Crop Sciences, Cornell University

  • 1979 Ph.D., Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 1971 B.A., Biology, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR

Chuck was the author of:

See also:

Email: Robert.Nurse [at] canada.ca (Robert[dot]Nurse[at]canada[dot]ca)

  • 2004 Ph.D., Weed Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2000 M.S., Weed Ecology, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON
  • 1998 B.S., (Hons), Ecology and Evolution, University of Western Ontario, London, ON

Email: orlowskijm [at] gmail.com (orlowskijm[at]gmail[dot]com)

Education

  • 2015 Ph.D., Crop Science, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
  • 2012 M.S., Agronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2010 B.S., Agricultural Sciences and Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Research Focus while a Member of Lab

The overall goal of my research is to help farmers increase the profitability of growing soybeans by choosing the proper equipment compliment based on their farm characteristics and rotation.

Education

  • 2004 M.S., Agricultural Sciences, University of Turin, Italy
  • 2005 Fellowship, Dept. of Agronomy, Forest and Land Management,, University of Turin, Italy

B.S. Universidade Estadual do Sudoeste da Bahia (UESB), Brazil 

Education

  • 2021 MPP, Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR
  • B.S. Student, Agricultural Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Email: as956 [at] cornell.edu (as956[at]cornell[dot]edu)

Education

  • 2012 B.S., Natural Resources, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Email: haoshen16 [at] sina.com (haoshen16[at]sina[dot]com)

Education

  • 2021 Ph.D. (Environmental Science), Beijing Normal University, Beijing, China
  • 2016 M.Sc. (Landscape gardening), Chinese Academy of Forestry, Beijing, China
  • 2014 B.Sc. (Landscape gardening), Henan Institute of Science and Technology, Luoyang , Henan , China

Email: jyshen88 [at] sjtu.edu (jyshen88[at]sjtu[dot]edu)

Education

  • 2005 Ph.D., Environnmental Engineering, Shanghai Jiaotong University, Shanghai, P.R. China
  • 2001 M.Sc., Aquatic Biology, Shanghai Normal University, Shanghai, P.R. China
  • 1987 B.Sc., Plant Protection, Shanghai Agricultural College, Shanghai, P.R. China

Email: res55 [at] cornell.edu (res55[at]cornell[dot]edu)

Education

  • 2007 M.S., Weed Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2003 B.A., English/ minor in Spanish, Oberlin College, Oberlin, OH

Email: lls14 [at] vtu.edu (lls14[at]vtu[dot]edu)

Education

  • 2014 PhD, Invasive Plant Ecology, Virginia Tech. Blacksburg, VA
  • 2006 M.S., Weed Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 1998 B.S., Plant Science, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Email: cas499 [at] cornell.edu (cas499[at]cornell[dot]edu)

Education

  • 2016 M.S., Weed Ecology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY
  • 2010 M.S., Agronomy (Concentration: Weed Science), University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • 2008 B.S., Honors, Plant Science (Concentration: Sustainable Crop Production and Management), University of Florida, Gainesville, FL

 

Email: kirsten.torresen [at] bioforsk.no (kirsten[dot]torresen[at]bioforsk[dot]no)

Education

  • 1989 M.S., Soil & Crop Sciences, Agricultural University of Norway, Norway
  • 1995 Ph.D., Weed Science, Agricultural University of Norway, Norway

Email: sew54 [at] cornell.edu (sew54[at]cornell[dot]edu)

Education

  • 2006 B.S., Plant Sciences, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY

Email: q_breeze [at] scau.edu.cn (q_breeze[at]scau[dot]edu[dot]cn)

Education

  • 2005 Ph.D., Ecosystem Analysis and Modeling, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P.R. China
  • 2002 M.S., Ecology, South China University of Tropical Agriculture, Danzhou, P.R. China
  • 1996 B.S., Agricultural Meteorology, Nanjing Meteorological University, Nanjing, P.R. China

Email: zhjw [at] zju.edu.cn (zhjw[at]zju[dot]edu[dot]cn)

Education

  • 2008 Ph.D., Agricultural Entomology and Pest Management, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P. R. China
  • 2005 M.S., Environmental Engineering (Focus on integrated weed management), Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P. R. China
  • 1991 B.S.(Agr.), Plant protection, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou, P. R. China