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Angela Poole, assistant professor, Division of Nutritional Sciences

Academic focus: The interplay between diet, host factors, and microbiota and the resulting effects on host physiology.
 
Previous positions: postdoctoral research associate, Cornell; research associate, Pennington Biomedical Research Center; long-term substitute teacher at Mark Keppel High
 
Academic background: B. S., Engineering & Applied Sciences, California Institute of Technology; Ph.D., Genome Sciences, University of Washington at Seattle
 
Last book read: “The Signal and the Noise: Why So Many Predictions Fail - But Some Don’t,” by Nate Silver
 
What do you do when not working?: Travel, photography, Kenpo karate
 
What gets you out of bed in the morning? Figuring out the next question. Finding an answer is only the beginning.
 
Current research projects? The projects in my lab are varied. The unifying goal is to identify statistically significant associations between microbial community composition and host phenotypes and to determine whether they are biologically relevant and if the activity of the microbes is causal and/or modulatory.
 
Courses you’re most looking forward to teaching? The diet and microbiome course that I am currently devising.

What most excites you about Cornell CALS? It provides the elements of the perfect storm for unprecedented, interdisciplinary research.

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