Funded Research Projects, FY2023

Project categories on this page:

Fruits, vegetables & specialty crops

  • Development of peel sap nitrogen analysis for 'Honeycrisp' apple
    Lailiang Cheng, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: ‘Honeycrisp’, a major apple variety grown in New York, is prone to bitter pit and often has inadequate color at harvest, both of which are exacerbated by high fruit nitrogen status. By developing peel sap nitrogen analysis, we seek to optimize fruit nitrogen status for better quality to improve the profitability of apple growers and the well-being of their rural communities.
  • Molecular and genetic mechanism of cold stress induced disease resistance to grapevine powdery mildew
    Jian Hua, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Acute Cold Stress Induced Disease Resistance (SIDR) is effective in delaying disease onset of powdery mildew in grapevines. This research will investigate mechanisms of cold SIDR through transcriptomic analysis and genetic mapping. The knowledge gained will guide the finding of ways, environmental or genetic, to enhance resistance to powdery mildew in grapevine and other crop plants.
  • Breeding nutritious peppers adapted for New York
    Michael Mazourek, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Peppers are a neglected source of vitamin A, C, B9 and quercetin in our diet, which reduce the risk of chronic human diseases. We lack data for the nutritional profile of peppers grown or consumed in NY. No single pepper has been bred for high levels of these nutrients nor in combination with adaptation to production in NY. We will focus our pepper breeding program on filling these needs.
  • Improving feasibility of sweet potato farming in New York state using arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
    Gaurav Moghe, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Sweet potato is a nutritious root crop that is undercultivated in NYS for multiple reasons. To address these, we will explore whether Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi can provide cold tolerance to young plants, enabling early season planting and incentivizing a local slip industry. Regular meetings, an NYS stakeholder conference and a whitepaper for colorant/functional foods are also planned.
  • Improving corn earworm pheromone trap monitoring through wind measurement in the cornfield
    Chris Roh, Biological & Environmental Engineering, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Corn earworm (CEW) is a major pest of NY sweet corn. While pheromone trap monitoring is a valuable tool, the connection between trap catches and in-field counts is imperfect. To better correlate them, we propose to study how wind on the farm spreads the pheromone and how CEW responds to varying concentrations. This study can improve guidelines for trap placement and pesticide application timing.
  • Collaborative potato breeding and variety development activities to enhance farm sustainability in the Eastern US
    Walter De Jong, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: This project seeks to develop new potato varieties adapted to the eastern US that meet grower and consumer needs alike. Candidate varieties with desirable quality traits will be developed and then evaluated in NY and seven other eastern states to identify those with broad adaptation. Complementary disease resistance and quality attribute screening will be provided by collaborators in ME and PA.
  • Improving economic and environmental sustainability in tree-fruit production through changes in rootstock use
    Gregory Peck, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: Rootstocks are used in commercial apple orchards to create highly efficient and precocious orchards, but there are significant knowledge gaps in identifying which rootstock genotypes are best suited for hard cider apple orchards. The proposed project will identify the rootstocks that will accelerate adoption and decrease risk for growers who are planting trees for the emerging cider industry.
  • Evaluating controlled environment agriculture LED lighting technology for effects on arthropod pests and biological control
    John Sanderson, Entomology, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Energy efficient LED lighting is increasingly used as the sole or supplementary lighting source for ornamental and edible crops grown in Controlled Environment Agriculture (CEA) facilities including greenhouses. Effects of this lighting on arthropod pests and biocontrol agents are unknown, but there is some evidence of effects. We will assess effects on common pests and beneficial arthropods.

Grains, grasses & forages

  • Breeding and genetics of the small grain cereals
    Mark Sorrells, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Cornell has the only small grains breeding program in the NE U.S. and our research contributes directly to goals of CCE including agriculture/food systems, adapting to climate change, nutrition and food safety, and community economic viability. Objectives are to develop and evaluate new cultivars of small grains, develop new breeding methods and characterize genes controlling important traits.
  • Improving forage and bioenergy crops for better adaptation, resilience, and nutritive value
    Virginia Moore, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: Diverse alfalfa germplasm will be adapted for NY production. Birdsfoot trefoil will be evaluated for compounds that control parasitic nematodes that reduce milk production. Cover crop varieties will be evaluated for regional adaptation. New varieties and populations of forage species will be evaluated for yield to determine resilience. Data will be available to extension educators and growers.
  • Conservation, management, enhancement and utilization of plant genetic resources
    Margaret Smith, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: We will tap corn genetic resources from the USDA and other gene banks to improve specialty corns (e.g., northern flints, open-pollinated varieties, food corns) for adaptation and performance in NY environments. The products will allow private sector entities to breed and/or market new specialty varieties for growers and consumers. Stakeholders will learn about the role and value of gene banks.
  • Conservation, management, enhancement and utilization of plant genetic resources
    Michael Gore, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: Root exudate metabolites are important to plant productivity and soil organic carbon (SOC) storage, but little is known about the dynamics of exudation and how exudation patterns shape soil processes. To that end, we will examine the genetic and environmental factors that impact the temporal and spatial variability of root exudate metabolites and their role in impacting the persistence of SOC.
  • Conservation, management, enhancement and utilization of plant genetic resources
    Jeffrey Doyle, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: The perennial wild relatives of soybean comprise >30 species harboring resistance to numerous soybean pathogens and are adapted to diverse climatic niches. We seek a better understanding of this largely untapped resource for improving genetically depauperate soybean. The principal source of data will be molecular markers sampled across the entire genome.
  • Risk assessment tool for predicting seedcorn maggot
    Katja Poveda, Entomology, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Seedcorn maggot (SCM) is a generalist pest of several crops in NY. It damages germinating seed, causing significant crop stand losses. Preventive seed treatments will soon not be available, requiring the development of accurate predictive tools. We will create a next-generation risk assessment model for better and more precise prediction of SCM.
  • Harnessing chemical ecology to address agricultural pest and pollinator priorities
    Katja Poveda, Entomology, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: Seed corn maggot (SCM) is a generalist pest of several economically important crops in NYS. It damages germinating seeds, causing significant crop losses. Preventive seed treatments will soon not be available requiring the development of alternative control methods. We will evaluate available lures and compare them to other oviposition cues of SCM to develop monitoring and trapping methods for IPM.

Trees & forests

  • Quantifying the carbon benefits of tree planting throughout New York state
    Peter Woodbury, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: We will quantify the potential carbon sequestration by planting trees on former agricultural lands in New York State by year 2050 while providing benefits such as wood products, recreation, and wildlife habitat. We will analyze stand growth and carbon sequestration rates, and the total statewide potential for carbon sequestration by 2050 in support of New York State climate legislative mandates.
  • Slash walls and LIDAR: measuring plantation and young-forest carbon
    Peter Smallidge, Natural Resources, CALS
    Funding source: McIntire-Stennis
    Project overview: Young forests are a key solution for NY GHG mitigation goals. It is essential to improve the success of forest regeneration and accurately estimate their carbon sequestration potential. Objectives (1) test terrestrial LIDAR estimates of Csequestration in young forests, (2) test slash walls efficacy, and (3) increase adoption of slash walls on commercial and production forest lands.
  • Use of environmental DNA to detect Hemlock Woolly Adelgid and evaluate biocontrol efficacy
    Mark Whitmore, Natural Resources, CALS
    Funding source: McIntire-Stennis
    Project overview: Hemlock woolly adelgid is an invasive pest that has killed untold millions of hemlocks in the eastern US. Hemlock is long-lived and the third most common tree in NY. It is important for sequestering carbon, scenic resources, and high quality paper. The sustainable solution is biological control with predators. We will use eDNA for early detection of HWA and to evaluate establishment of biocontrols. 

Soil & water

  • Optimizing soil microbiome management to enhance foliar resistance to insect pests on organic farms
    Clare Casteel, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: We demonstrated soil microbiomes from organic farms increase foliar resistance to insect pests. In this proposal we will evaluate specific management practices that may cultivate or inhibit insect-suppressive soil microbes. Specifically, we will evaluate the impact of composting, microbial inoculants, and biopesticides on microbe-induced resistance to flea beetles and aphids with NY soils.
  • SOIL3: Soil Online Information, Investigation and Innovation Laboratory
    Jonathan Russell-Anelli, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch and Smith Lever
    Project overview: With a mix of collaborative field inventory (NRCS & Soil Health Lab) and content development (CCE), SOIL3 will improve on information outreach efforts when addressing the prior identified statewide soil information needs of 1) constructed soils, 2) use of mulch/compost, 3) soil contamination and 4) urban soils. Partnering will magnify effort allowing for better and more impactful soil guidance.
  • Maximizing watershed data for Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) and Nine Element (9E) modeling using machine learning
    Scott Steinschneider, Biological & Environmental Engineering, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: New York State faces chronic water quality problems linked to non-point source pollution from agriculture and climate extremes. To evaluate land use management and improved water quality, communities use simulation models that require substantial flow and water quality data that are often not available. This work will develop a database of these variables across the state using machine learning.
  • Optimizing woodchip field bioreactors for phosphorus removal to protect water quality
    Todd Walter, Biological & Environmental Engineering, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Like most of the world, New York State faces the chronic challenge of protecting water resources from non-point source nutrient pollution. One relatively recent, low-cost technology that has been adopted is woodchip bioreactors. While these have been shown to be relatively effective for reducing nitrogen pollution, this project will investigate designs to facilitate phosphorus removal.
  • Atmospheric input of ammonia to Finger Lakes as a contributor to increasing toxicity of cyanobacterial blooms
    Robert Howarth, Ecology & Evolutionary Biology, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Over the past decade, cyanobacterial blooms (HABs) have increased in size and toxicity across the Finger Lakes. Nitrogen likely contributes to increased toxicity, posing a major public health risk. This research will characterize: 1) air-transport of nitrogen-rich ammonia from farm operations directly to lake surfaces; and 2) farm practices that are most responsible for this atmospheric ammonia.

Dairy

  • Pyrolysis system on New York state dairy farms
    Johannes Lehmann, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Together with a group of NYS dairy farmers, this project will quantify the technical aspects, the economic feasibility, and the environmental effects of implementing pyrolysis and biochar production from dairy manure. The biochar product will be utilized as an ingredient for potting media produced by a company located in Upstate NY, and therefore eliminate manure input to nearby fields.
  • Determining DNA methylation heritability, association to calf scours, and impact on performance in dairy cattle
    Heather Huson, Animal Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Genetic selection of dairy cattle uses selection models to inform breeding of economically important heritable traits. Recent studies have shown a link between DNA methylation and phenotypic expression in cattle. Research is needed to understand the inheritance, effect of, and change in methylation over time so that selection becomes more accurate, helping farmers reduce costs and increase income.
  • Characterizing and quantifying the non-essential amino acid requirements of lactating dairy cattle
    Michael Van Amburgh, Animal Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: This series of studies will evaluate the role that non-essential amino acids (NEAA) play in milk and milk component yield in high-producing dairy cattle. Improving our understanding of the role of NEAA in milk and milk component yield will allow us to reduce the amount of crude protein fed to cattle to reduce the environmental impact of dairy production and improve profitability of dairy farms.
  • Use of precision fermentation to create novel and sustainable dairy products for New York
    Samuel Alcaine, Food Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Advances in fermentation are changing the way we make foods. Bacteria are traditionally used to ferment dairy but can fail and result in product loss. New yeast strains that produce lactic acid offer an alternative. This research would lay the groundwork for novel dairy fermentations, that could be leveraged to open alternative markets for large and small NYS Dairy producers.
  • Prevalence of Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease virus antibodies in domestic and wild ruminants in New York
    Elisha Frye, Population Medicine & Diagnostic Sciences, CVM
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease is a vector-borne virus that affects ruminants. White-tailed deer recently experienced mortality (>2,000 dead) across New York State. Infected cattle are typically asymptomatic, but dairy cattle on Long Island were affected. We will test ruminant samples from NY for antibodies to EHD to understand statewide prevalence, serotype, and communicate risk to veterinarians.
  • Advancing veterinary diagnostics to support New York dairy production through development of a rapid test for Leptospira
    Kelsi Sandoz, Population Medicine & Diagnostic Sciences, CVM
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Diagnostic testing for infectious diseases is essential to maintaining dairy herd health, quality milk production, and ensuring that disease-free animals and agricultural products enter the market. We will develop the diagnostic test for Leptospirosis interrogans into a high-throughput and automated test that will deliver rapid results and decrease the cost of diagnostic testing.
  • Optimizing colostrum harvest on New York State dairy farms
    Matthias Wieland, Population Medicine & Diagnostic Sciences, CVM
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Optimal pre-milking stimulation is paramount to harvest high-quality colostrum as quickly, gently, and completely as possible while maintaining udder health and animal well-being. In this project, we will study the effect of 4 different pre-milking stimulation strategies to increase colostrum quantity and to improve colostrum quality in dairy cows.
  • National animal nutrition program
    Joseph McFadden, Animal Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: The Whitehouse U.S. Methane Mitigation Emissions Reduction Action Plan stipulates that livestock agriculture lower enteric methane emissions. The proposed work will develop a climate-controlled respiration chamber system at Cornell, unique in the United States, to discover and validate nutritional approaches to inhibit ruminal methanogenesis in dairy cattle.
  • Contribution of ovarian function, uterine receptivity, and embryo quality to pregnancy success in ruminants
    Yi Athena Ren Ren, Animal Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: In New York State, the rate of successful pregnancy in dairy cows hovers at a low of around 40%. This wastes 200 million dollars annually and is primarily due to abnormal functions of the ovary and the uterus. Our research aims to identify novel molecular mechanisms regulating the function of the ovary and the uterus, which can be targeted to increase the success rate of pregnancy in dairy cows.
  • Contribution of ovarian function, uterine receptivity, and embryo quality to pregnancy success in ruminants
    Vimal Selvaraj, Animal Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: Low fertility performance in cows directly affects profits in dairy farms. Poor embryo survival is a major factor contributing to low reproductive success and challenges to management. This project is a continuation, advancing to initial testing and application of detected pregnancy biomarkers that might be useful for developing a cow-side pregnancy diagnosis test.

Animal agriculture

  • Grape pomace as a natural antibiotic growth promotor alternative in poultry feed
    Elad Tako, Food Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Grapes have the highest production volume by weight of any fruit in the U.S.; however, 20% of volume remains as pomace after processing and can cause environmental and economic issues. Investigation of grape pomace as a natural nutritional alternative for antibiotics in poultry feed will allow the development of optimized processes and implementable guidelines for pomace use and waste management.
  • Selecting brook trout strains to maximize hatchery-based fish production under climate change
    Thomas Detmer, Natural Resources, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Trout hatcheries in New York State produce fish for angling and direct consumption. Rearing ponds and stocked waterbodies are threatened by warming temperatures. We will evaluate growth and survival for six major brook trout strains under different climate conditions. Our results will indicate which strains will maximize future trout production for stocking and aquaculture.

Pollinators & biodiversity

  • DNA barcoding as a tool for rapid assessment of pollinator biodiversity in New York state agroecosystems
    Bryan Danforth, Entomology, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: New York agriculture is dependent on bee pollination. Rapid and accurate assessment of pollinator community diversity can be a challenge. We propose to develop tools for rapid assessment of bee diversity using DNA barcoding. Rapidly assessing bee diversity will facilitate ongoing research on agriculture, natural resources, and sustainable energy, and will lead to more sustainable land management.
  • Assessing whether varroa-mediated virus spillover is a threat to native crop pollinators
    Scott McArt, Entomology, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Managed and wild pollinators contribute >$400m/year in pollination services to NY agriculture. But pollinators are declining, in part due to novel parasites including the varroa mite and its associated viruses. This project will assess whether or not varroa-mediated virus spillover from managed honey bees negatively impacts wild native bees and flies, many of which are important crop pollinators. 

Invasive species

  • Use of entomopathogenic fungi for control of spotted lanternfly
    Ann Hajek, Entomology, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Invasive spotted lanternflies that are spreading pose a significant threat to agriculture. Two fungal pathogens have naturally controlled spotted lanternfly populations in PA. Laboratory and field studies will be conducted toward use of these two species of fungal pathogens for spotted lanternfly control. Studies will also investigate conditions toward optimizing control.
  • Taming the tiger: understanding mosquito population connectivity to improve mosquito control
    Courtney Murdock, Entomology, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: The Asian tiger mosquito is an invasive mosquito present in New York. It transmits many pathogens (e.g., dengue and Zika viruses) and is a backyard pest. Our research will focus on understanding landscape features affecting its distribution and abundance. We will produce a user-friendly forecasting model that will predict the time of season and areas that may support high abundance to aid control.

Food safety

  • Developing an accelerated aging approach to assess in-bottle/can re-fermentation risk
    Patrick Gibney, Food Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Residual sugar in wine, cider, or beer poses a risk of refermentation in the bottle/can, resulting in a spoiled and potentially dangerous product. Standard testing likely overestimates the refermentation risk, leading to unnecessary remediation. This research seeks to develop a more accurate detection method to benefit NY fermented beverage producers/consumers.
  • Engineering for food safety and quality
    Carmen Moraru, Food Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: We will use a combined experimental and modeling approach to predict drying behavior and structure formation (expansion) during microwave vacuum drying of food protein matrices. The generated information will allow food processors, particularly small and medium size entrepreneurs who lack research and development capabilities, to develop novel, shelf stable protein products of desired structure. 

Youth, family & communities

  • Advancing NYC school-based agriculture through civic engagement
    Marianne Krasny, Natural Resources, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: This project will help NYC public schools advance students’ civic engagement through urban agriculture education programs. We will investigate how programs in school gardens and hydroponic systems enable students to address food injustice and become contributing members of their communities. Results will be instrumental in enhancing urban agriculture education curricula in NYC schools.
  • StayWell ECE: Examining the health of New York early childhood educators
    Laura Bellows, Nutritional Sciences, CHE
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Early Childhood Education (ECE) professionals are experiencing poor physical health. The proposed project’s, StayWell ECE (Staff and Youth Wellness for Early Childhood Educators), overall goal is to evaluate teachers’ health and wellbeing, identify potential intervention targets, and develop an intervention plan through a participatory process with ECE teachers/staff and community stakeholders.
  • Social, economic and environmental causes and consequences of demographic change in rural America
    Mildred Warner, Global Development, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: This project will assess stressors for local governments and how local and state policies affect the health and economic wellbeing of rural populations. There is great diversity in the capacity of rural local governments to meet the service needs of rural residents. Collaborative research with local government associations will highlight innovative strategies to address changing demographic needs.
  • Personal protective technologies for current and emerging occupational and environmental hazards
    Fatma Baytar, Human Centered Design, CHE
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: This research focuses on designing and sizing adjustable protective coveralls (PPE) to accommodate the body changes of female farmworkers who work in dangerous environments before, during, and after pregnancy. Because of this, the study will focus on analyzing body measurements of women from national sizing surveys to develop better coverall sizing systems and develop a novel design.
  • Personal protective technologies for current and emerging occupational and environmental hazards
    Margaret Frey, Human Centered Design, CHE
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: As occupational conditions grow increasingly diverse and hazardous, new technologies offer the opportunity to impart increased functionality, wearability, and usability to PPE systems. In materials science, new textiles, fibers, and finishing technologies can better meet workers' functional and comfort needs. Additionally, computer modeling can predict performance of material systems. 
  • Personal protective technologies for current and emerging occupational and environmental hazards
    Heeju Terry Park, Human Centered Design, CHE
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate and Smith Lever
    Project overview: This proposal includes 1) research activities focused on developing and evaluating smart firegear that has sensors incorporated, capable of monitoring firefighters’ health conditions (e.g., heart rate and respiration), and 2) extension activities supporting 4H STEM education aligned with the smart firegear research, and incorporating sensor technology, programming, material science, and clothing.

Climate change & sustainability

  • Impact analyses and decision strategies for agricultural research
    Ortiz Bobea, Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate 
    Project overview: The project ultimately seeks to quantify the R&D investments needed to increase productivity and compensate projected climate change impacts on US and global agriculture. This will require studies analyzing both the historical and future impacts of climate change on agriculture but also analyzing the returns of R&D on productivity growth.
  • Optimizing soil microbiome management to enhance foliar resistance to insect pests on organic farms
    Clare Casteel, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: We demonstrated soil microbiomes from organic farms increase foliar resistance to insect pests. In this proposal we will evaluate specific management practices that may cultivate or inhibit insect-suppressive soil microbes. Specifically, we will evaluate the impact of composting, microbial inoculants, and biopesticides on microbe-induced resistance to flea beetles and aphids with NY soils.
  • Maximizing Watershed Data for Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) and Nine Element (9E) modeling using machine learning
    Scott Steinschneider, Biological & Environmental Engineering, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: New York State faces chronic water quality problems linked to non-point source pollution from agriculture and climate extremes. To evaluate land use management and improved water quality, communities use simulation models that require substantial flow and water quality data that are often not available. This work will develop a database of these variables across the state using machine learning.
  • Optimizing woodchip field bioreactors for phosphorus removal to protect water quality
    Todd Walter, Biological & Environmental Engineering, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Like most of the world, New York State faces the chronic challenge of protecting water resources from non-point source nutrient pollution. One relatively recent, low-cost technology that has been adopted is woodchip bioreactors. While these have been shown to be relatively effective for reducing nitrogen pollution, this project will investigate designs to facilitate phosphorus removal.
  • Improving economic and environmental sustainability in tree-fruit production through changes in rootstock use
    Gregory Peck, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: Rootstocks are used in commercial apple orchards to create highly efficient and precocious orchards, but there are significant knowledge gaps in identifying which rootstock genotypes are best suited for hard cider apple orchards. The proposed project will identify the rootstocks that will accelerate adoption and decrease risk for growers who are planting trees for the emerging cider industry.
  • Quantifying the carbon benefits of tree planting throughout New York State
    Peter Woodbury, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: We will quantify the potential carbon sequestration by planting trees on former agricultural lands in New York State by year 2050 while providing benefits such as wood products, recreation, and wildlife habitat. We will analyze stand growth and carbon sequestration rates, and the total statewide potential for carbon sequestration by 2050 in support of New York State climate legislative mandates.
  • Slash Walls and LIDAR: Measuring Plantation and Young-Forest Carbon
    Peter Smallidge, Natural Resources, CALS
    Funding source: McIntire-Stennis
    Project overview: Young forests are a key solution for NY GHG mitigation goals. It is essential to improve the success of forest regeneration and accurately estimate their carbon sequestration potential. Objectives (1) test terrestrial LIDAR estimates of Csequestration in young forests, (2) test slash walls efficacy, and (3) increase adoption of slash walls on commercial and production forest lands.
  • Pyrolysis system on New York state dairy farms
    Johannes Lehmann, School of Integrative Plant Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Together with a group of NYS dairy farmers, this project will quantify the technical aspects, the economic feasibility, and the environmental effects of implementing pyrolysis and biochar production from dairy manure. The biochar product will be utilized as an ingredient for potting media produced by a company located in Upstate NY, and therefore eliminate manure input to nearby fields.
  • National animal nutrition program
    Joseph McFadden, Animal Science, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch Multistate
    Project overview: The Whitehouse U.S. Methane Mitigation Emissions Reduction Action Plan stipulates that livestock agriculture lower enteric methane emissions. The proposed work will develop a climate-controlled respiration chamber system at Cornell, unique in the United States, to discover and validate nutritional approaches to inhibit ruminal methanogenesis in dairy cattle.
  • Selecting brook trout strains to maximize hatchery-based fish production under climate change
    Thomas Detmer, Natural Resources, CALS
    Funding source: Hatch
    Project overview: Trout hatcheries in New York State produce fish for angling and direct consumption. Rearing ponds and stocked waterbodies are threatened by warming temperatures. We will evaluate growth and survival for six major brook trout strains under different climate conditions. Our results will indicate which strains will maximize future trout production for stocking and aquaculture.