Pollinator Protection Guides

Whether you're a beekeeper, a farmer, or a land manager, you care about maintaining diverse pollinator communities. These guides — written by experts from across Cornell University — will help anyone looking to implement best management practices to protect pollinator health.  They assist diverse stakeholder groups from across New York and around the world in working together with the common goal of conserving pollinators.

For information about New York State's pollinator protection initiatives, visit NYS Department of Ag. and Markets' Pollinator Protection Plan website.

A researcher surveys blossoms in an apple orchard for native bees

Growers and beekeepers can learn a lot from each other. Whether honey bees are being used for pollination services, or if hives are simply located near agricultural land, this handout details communication topics and resources to ensure healthy crops and bees.

a bumblebee pollinates an apple blossom

Written by Cornell University, Penn State University, and the XERCES Society, this comprehensive guide introduces orchard growers to the wild bee species who pollinate their crops. It includes a photo guide to identify bees, tips for improving bee diversity in orchards, and a summary of bee toxicities for commonly used orchard pesticides.

an orchard with rows of apple trees with pink blooms and yellow dandelions on the ground

This guide helps
 growers and pesticide applicators understand and compare the acute toxicity and synergistic effects of different pesticides
 on pollinators, helping them choose a product that is effective against target pests but poses minimal risk to bees.

A garden with orange and red flowers in the foreground and a lawn in the background

This guide helps
 landscape managers, turf specialists, Christmas tree growers, and horticulturists understand and compare the acute toxicity and synergistic effects of different pesticides
 on pollinators, helping them choose a product that is effective against target pests but poses minimal risk to bees.