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See how our current work and research is bringing new thinking and new solutions to some of today's biggest challenges.

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The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences welcomed seven new faculty members this fall, advancing the college’s commitment to pursuing purpose-driven science and improving the lives of people across New York state and around the world.

Confronting complex challenges and pioneering new solutions are key facets of the college’s mission. Learn more about all our new faculty members in the profiles below.
A headshot of Jingyue (Ellie) Duan

Assistant professor, Department of Animal Science

A headshot of Laura Gunn

Assistant professor, Plant Biology Section in the School of Integrative Plant Science

A headshot of Mario Herrero

Professor, Department of Global Development; Cornell Atkinson Scholar; Nancy and Peter Meinig Family Investigator in the Life Sciences

A headshot of Ian Owens

Louis Agassiz Fuertes Director, Cornell Lab of Ornithology; professor, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

A headshot of Chris Roh

Assistant professor, Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering

A headshot of Vivek Srikrishnan

Assistant professor, Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering

A headshot of Jinhua Zhao

David J. Nolan Dean of the Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management; professor of applied economics and policy

Keep Exploring

Students walking on Ho Plaza

Spotlight

This is the first in a series of stories detailing the actions CALS students, faculty and staff have taken over the past year to make our community a more diverse, equitable and inclusive place for everyone. Here, we highlight some of our student-led efforts – these emerging leaders, often through sheer labors of love, emphasize inclusive excellence and are motivated by a desire to make the path easier for those who will follow.
  • Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Landscape Architecture
  • Microbiology
Jim Giovannoni inspecting tomatoes

News

A team of researchers have identified a gene that regulates tomato softening independent of ripening, a finding that could help tomato and other fruit breeders strike the right balance between good shelf life and high-quality flavor.
  • School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Plant Biology Section
  • Agriculture