Graduate Field of Entomology

World-wide impact on entomological research

The Graduate Field of Entomology at Cornell includes 44 faculty conducting research in all aspects of insect biology, including systematics, phylogenetics, evolution, ecology, behavior, conservation, climate change, citizen science, invasive species, genetics, genomics, physiology, biological control, medical entomology, and pesticide toxicology.

Master of Science (M.S.)

The Graduate School at Cornell is organized into “Training Fields,” that span college and department administrative units. Fields draw their graduate faculty from multiple disciplines and departments, so students have access to a diversity of scholarship in their respective areas of study.

Every candidate for the M.S. degree in Entomology is expected to submit a thesis at the end of their degree program. The details of thesis content and construction vary among students. An M.S. degree can be conferred once your thesis has been judged to be "complete" by your Major Advisor and Special Committee

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) or M.S./Ph.D.

The Graduate School at Cornell is organized into “Training Fields,” that span college and department administrative units. Fields draw  their graduate faculty from multiple disciplines and departments, so students have access to a diversity of scholarship in their respective areas of study. 

Every candidate for the M.S. and Ph.D. degree in Entomology is expected to submit a thesis at the end of their degree program.  The details of thesis content and construction vary among students.  An M.S. or Ph.D. degree can be conferred once your thesis has been judged to be “complete” by your Major Advisor and Special Committee. 

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.)

The Graduate School at Cornell is organized into "Training Fields," that span college and department administrative units. Fields draw  their graduate faculty from multiple disciplines and departments, so students have access to a diversity of scholarship in their respective areas of study. 

Every candidate for the Ph.D. degree in Entomology is expected to submit a thesis at the end of their degree program.  The details of thesis content and construction vary among students.  A Ph.D. degree can be conferred once your thesis has been judged to be “complete” by your Major Advisor and Special Committee. 

Ph.D. students in Entomology are required to take what we call the "A exam", ideally in the second year of your degree program.  The Exam is administered by the Special Committee, and will vary depending on the composition of your committee.  The format of the exam is generally oral, and will include a written component.  Topics to be covered may include anything relevant to your proposed research and degree program.  Your Advisor and Committee Members will guide you in preparation for your A exam.

Areas of Specialization

A microscopic image of tiny arthropods on a strawberry leaf.

Ecology, Evolution, Systematics, and Behavior

How insects navigate and adapt to their environments, interact with other organisms they contact, and evolve over time. Insects are arguably the most successful group on planet Earth, residing year-around on all seven continents and comprising over half of all scientifically described species.

Managed Systems Entomology

Applied control of insect pests in agricultural, urban, conservation, and public health contexts. Insects constitute a tremendous model system for studying diverse biological fields, but their direct impact on us in everyday life remains one of the primary reasons for studying them.

Physiology, Molecular Biology, Genetics, and Genomics

How insects function underneath the cuticle. Research in sub‑organismal insect biology at Cornell integrates a range of analysis from genomics and RNA editing to behavioral physiology and nutrition.