Back

Discover CALS

See how our current work and research is bringing new thinking and new solutions to some of today's biggest challenges.

The Cornell Lab of Ornithology’s debut feature film, the award-winning documentary, “Bird of Prey,” is now available for rent or purchase on iTunes, Amazon and Vimeo.

“Bird of Prey” weaves stunning natural history footage of the critically endangered great Philippine eagle with the remarkable story of wildlife cinematographer Neil Rettig and a small group of conservationists from the Philippine Eagle Foundation, who work tirelessly to save the bird from extinction.

The film follows Rettig’s return to the Philippines 36 years after he and his crew captured the first-ever recorded images of the eagle in the wild. Decades later, Rettig returns to the Philippine jungle on a grueling expedition to find the reclusive raptor and once again film a pair of eagles as they attempt to raise a newborn chick.

“Remarkably, the wild chick was born the first day we were rolling cameras in the forest,” said director Eric Liner, from the Lab of Ornithology. “It was incredibly exciting and dramatic, but it also came with the disquieting realization that we couldn’t be sure if the chick would survive.”

With fewer than 400 breeding pairs left in the wild, the Philippine eagle is considered the world’s rarest bird of prey and the future survival of the species is in doubt.

“Bird of Prey” is available for rent or purchase on iTunes, Amazon and Vimeo. Sales from the film go directly to supporting the continued conservation efforts of the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

Keep Exploring

Buz Bastos stands by a window in his lab.

Field Note

Buz Barstow: Resuming research during the pandemic
Buz Barstow, assistant professor in the Department of Biological and Environmental Engineering, works on engineering microbes that can store renewable energy, sequester carbon dioxide and mine rare earth elements for sustainable energy...
  • Biological and Environmental Engineering
  • Health + Nutrition
  • Biology
A woman standing at the front of a room of people talking into a microphone

News

Study finds food safety practices benefit small farmers
But a new Cornell study finds that when small-scale farmers are trained in food safety protocols and develop a farm food safety plan, new markets open up to them, leading to an overall gain in revenue. “Our results should be welcomed by growers...
  • Food Science
  • Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management
  • Agriculture