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Exploration for Conservation with Phil Torres '07

periodiCALS, Vol. 7, Issue 1, 2017

Phil Torres ’07 puts the focus on wildlife conservation as a TV host, science reporter, educator, and photographer.
Phil Torres ’07 

With a passion for entomology and the grit for muddy, tropical adventures, Phil Torres ’07 puts the focus on wildlife conservation as a TV host, science reporter, educator, and photographer. He has appeared on Animal Planet, the Discovery Channel, the BBC, and Al Jazeera America, and he chronicles his latest finds on Instagram (@phil_torres) and his YouTube channel, "The Jungle Diaries." On expeditions to remote areas around the world, he’s witnessed rare sights, including salt-seeking butterflies sipping the tears of turtles and spiders that sculpt larger decoy spiders of silk, leaves, and dead insects. Below he shares his notes on species that have recently caught his eye.

Not all beetles are alike—this glittery Compsus benoisti weevil is one of the most dazzling insect species I have come across. Spotted in Mindo, Ecuador.
Not all beetles are alike—this glittery Compsus benoisti weevil is one of the most dazzling insect species I have come across. Spotted in Mindo, Ecuador.

 

A baby sea turtle soon to be released as part of a conservation project led by Paso Pacifico, a Nicaraguan conservation organization that focuses on preserving the country’s southwest coast.
A baby sea turtle soon to be released as part of a conservation project led by Paso Pacifico, a Nicaraguan conservation organization that focuses on preserving the country’s southwest coast.

 

Never underestimate the beauty of urban wildlife. Despite having worked in the field all over the world, the closest I’ve have ever been to a bird of prey was this red-tailed hawk hunting in the middle of New York City’s Central Park.
Never underestimate the beauty of urban wildlife. Despite having worked in the field all over the world, the closest I’ve ever been to a bird of prey was this red-tailed hawk hunting in the middle of New York City’s Central Park.

 

Nature is full of bizarre forms, especially in one of most biodiverse places on earth—Yasuni National Park in Ecuador. This is a wasp parasitizing a praying mantis egg case.
Nature is full of bizarre forms, especially in one of most biodiverse places on earth—Yasuni National Park in Ecuador. This is a wasp parasitizing a praying mantis egg case.