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Standing Committee Nominations

CALS Faculty Executive Committee

CALS Faculty Executive Committee
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Kerik Cox

Dr. Kerik Cox manages a program of tree fruit and berry research, extension, and teaching at Cornell AgriTech in Geneva. Cox’s research efforts blend both basic and translational research with an emphasis on genomics, bioinformatics, and applied management of agricultural antimicrobial resistance, and diseases of apple, stone fruit, and strawberries. Extension efforts focus on disease forecasting, pesticide education, and disease management programs for fruit stakeholders. Teaching efforts include undergraduate and graduate level Plant Pathology courses with emphasis on implementing problem-based learning, remote instruction, and alternative assessment. Cox has been interested in shared governance for several years having served on the committee for the reorganization of CALS plant sciences that led to the School of Integrative Plant Science, and presently serving as chair of the Committee in Support of Teaching and Learning. Cox works to increase connections between the Ithaca campus, Cornell AgriTech, and industry stakeholders by integrating and capitalizing on perspectives and experiences from his classrooms, extension programing, and research colleagues in every endeavor.

Ping Wang
Sahara Byrne

During the past two years, I have grown even more passionate about the role of the CFEC in our college. I am most proud of how we have clarified our policies by creating bylaws and planted the seeds for long-term shared governance in our college. I am running again to continue executing the vision for CFEC, to provide transparency between CALS faculty and administration, in a time of administrative transition and financial uncertainty in the face of the COVID epidemic. I am a Professor in the Department of Communication who teaches our large intro course, sports and media, and a PhD course on theory construction. My research involves large-scale, carefully controlled, randomized experiments testing effects of persuasive health messages on difficult to reach populations. My work usually carries communication law and policy implications, especially where public health considerations run into the 1st Amendment’s protection of Freedom of Expression.

Miguel Gomez

I am the Robert G. Tobin Associate Professor in the Dyson School of Applied Economics and Management. I am Director of the Food Industry Management Program, which is globally recognized as the premier food industry education, research and outreach program. My work focuses on the economics of food systems and their interdependence with sustainability outcomes. I would like to serve in the CALS Faculty Executive Committee because most of my work involves collaborations with CALS faculty in several units. I also deeply care about maintaining strong ties between the Dyson School and CALS under the current administrative structure. If I am elected, it is my main goal to be a voice of the faculty in CALS’s policy decisions, in particular as the university adjusts to the new reality brought by the pandemic, as we need to be proactive in responding to the challenges ahead.

Academic Achievement and Petitions Committee

Academic Achievement and Petitions Committee
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Darlene Campbell

My interest in serving on the Academic Achievement and Petitions Committee stems from my commitment to student success in the college. Student success is often defined through the lenses of students who are excelling in their classes and making their way through Cornell with relative ease. In my experience, there is also a robust population of students who struggle academically. In counseling these students, I have found that in most instances, there is no singular cause for poor academic performance. Instead, when I have conversations with students who are having difficulty, more often than not there are a variety of factors – some the responsibility of the students, some not directly under the students’ control – that contributed to poor academic performance. As the instructor of an individualized instruction course, it is essential to be fair in determining solutions despite the differences in causes while working to increase the likelihood of student success. Using good judgment and common sense while staying committed to helping students has allowed me to do this, even while delivering information that may be unpopular. My participation on the committee will match my experience in terms of what is practical and will work for students to ensure their success and what will not, with the committee’s work reviewing student petitions.

Lauren Chambliss

I'm interested in serving on the Academic Achievement and Petitions Committee as an outgrowth of my engagement with students in the classroom and genuine interest in the whole-life experience of our students. I teach three classes a semester, all intensive writing and communication-skills building courses. Since the classes are small and interactive, I get to know students at a deeper level. I hear about their stresses, challenges, and successes through their writing and sharing. In my department, Communication, I engage with nearly every one of our undergraduates, since the main course I teach is a core requirement. This gives me an insight into campus life from diverse perspectives, from first-gen students from tougher circumstances to affluent students from the “best” schools. I would bring a high level of compassion and a practical approach to problem-solving to this committee, which primarily serves to act on student petitions.

John Losey

Academic Integrity Hearing Board

Academic Integrity Hearing Board
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Scott Peters
Martin Wiedmann

CALS Diversity and Inclusion Committee

CALS Diversity and Inclusion Committee
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Karim-Aly Kassam

Dr. Karim-Aly S. Kassam is International (Associate) Professor of Environmental and Indigenous Studies in the Department of Natural Resources and the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program. Over his 26-year research and teaching career, he has actively investigated the relationship between biological and cultural diversity. Dr. Kassam works in indigenous and rural societies in Arctic, Forest, and Mountain environments. He has successfully taken young indigenous students from the communities where he works and engaged them in both graduate and undergraduate study. For him, difference matters because cognitive diversity and diverse ways of knowing contribute to addressing the fundamental challenges of the third millennium such as food and health sovereignty, climate change, and structural poverty. Through his applied research, he has expanded the notion of pluralism.

Valerie Aymers

As a landscape architect, I have designed landscapes for people of all ages, ethnicities, abilities and socio-economic backgrounds: places that comfort, engage and promote social well-being. I was taught these principles as a landscape architecture student in CALS in 1999, where I learned that in addition to understanding the environmental impacts of design, social inclusion and diversity creates more successful designs and equitable environments. Now, as a site engineering and design studio professor, and a faculty member of color, I teach our landscape architecture students the importance of diversity in our profession, inclusion in our designs, and the principles of the Americans with Disabilities Act. As designers, it is ingrained in us that these principles are the structure that supports our design, but it is how we choose to implement these principles that make for great designs. The opportunity to participate on the Diversity and Inclusion committee is a chance to create similar principles that enhance the educational and social experience, achieve a greater understanding and empathy for diversity in all its forms, and thereby create a more supportive environment for all of CALS.

Quirine Ketterings

I joined Cornell University in the fall of 2000. I initiated and lead the Nutrient Management Spear Program at Cornell University (NMSP), the applied research and extension program in nutrient management of field crops of the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. We work with dairy and cash grain farmers, farm crop consultants and nutrient management planners, Cornell Cooperative Extension educators, government agency staff, and state regulators on on-farm research and extension programming. Our program mission is to aid in implementation of environmentally sound nutrient management practices in New York State, and provide methods and tools to integrate and apply accumulated knowledge about crop nutrient guidelines to optimize crop yield while minimizing risk to the environment. Our campus based NMSP team typically consisting of 6-8 different nationalities, 18 to 60+ years in age, with a great diversity in backgrounds, upbringing, perspectives, and abilities. Mutual respect and interest in people and their well-being are the foundation of our program's success. This has been a foundation for my involvement in many department and college committees over the past 19+ years as well. I will bring the same perspective to the Diversity and Inclusion Committee, if elected to serve.

Faculty Advisory Committee on Tenure Appointments (FACTA)

Faculty Advisory Committee on Tenure Appointments (FACTA)
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Dave Wolfe

I think my experience serving on numerous tenure review committees during my Cornell career, as well as having official research, teaching and extension responsibilities, makes me a good fit for this committee.

Patricia Johnson

Mann Library Committee

Mann Library Committee
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Brooke Duffy
Robin Dando

I study the taste system, how it influences our feeding behavior, and how factors such as obesity can have an impact on either. I joined Cornell around 8 years ago, and since then have spent countless hours in Mann Library, appreciating its lesser known spots and resources that make it a true gift to CALS. Having served once on this committee, for some of this term as chair, I am well prepared for the committee’s responsibilities, and happy to contribute to the direction of this world-class institution.

Nominations Committee

Nominations Committee
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Brian Chabot

I understand the important role that the Nominations Committee plays in identifying candidates for the committees and positions that are part of effective faculty governance. This comes from having served on the nominations committee for the university faculty and holding numerous leadership roles in my department, college, and university. I recently made the case to the CALS Executive Committee that retired faculty can help with some faculty committees because of their broad knowledge and experience with the college. Serving on the Nominations Committee is a chance to test this theory. Although retired, I continue to advise students in several majors and serve on college and university committees.

Sam Nugen
Robert Raguso

I am happy to support the CALS mission by serving on this committee. My prior experiences as Chair of Neurobiology and Behavior, the CALS Leadership Training Course and Chair of the AD White Professors-at-Large Committee allowed me to interact with diverse members of our community and appreciate their creativity, responsibility and excellence.

Support of Teaching and Learning Committee

Support of Teaching and Learning Committee
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Jeremy Allen

To date, the best moment of my life was when I received an email notifying me that I was the 2020 recipient of the CALS Young Faculty Teaching Award. I am very passionate about teaching and am always trying to improve my methods, lectures, and approach to teaching. Moreover, I sincerely enjoy sharing this passion with others and discussing different teaching methods with my colleagues. I am lucky that as a Lecturer, I can devote most of my time to teaching and developing new strategies. I am running for a position on the Support of Teaching and Learning Committee because I hope to share my passion, my successes, and failures with others who are trying to improve the ways in which we approach teaching a large and diverse audience of students.

Christopher Byrne

My teaching career began in August of 2002 at Carpinteria High School- just south of Santa Barbara- where I found myself face to face with forty- five mostly disinterested eleventh graders armed only with a California emergency credential, no classroom experience, and not a single education course under my belt. Those students taught me just about everything I needed to know about classroom management, lesson planning, assessment, and most of all empathy. In 2015, after thirteen years teaching high school English, I landed a dream job at Cornell. The success I found here is rooted, in big part, from the pedagogical values I acquired in secondary education. Cornell students are smart and motivated but require creativity, engagement, and compassion to succeed. I believe that as a member of the Support of Teaching & Learning Committee, I can make significant contributions to the improvement and growth of our academic community.

Jonathan Russell-Anelli

How do we teach to enhance the learning outcomes of our students? I have embraced a diverse approach to teaching to best serve my undergraduate and graduate students. As a teacher of 25+ years in various positions from pre-K to graduate education in special education to adult learning my efforts have included various learning approaches and tools in person and online for classes of one to 85. Yet throughout the efforts and time, one truth has carried through, the support for education on the part of administration, teachers and students has always been the best measure of teacher and student success. The Support of Teaching and Learning Committee provides insight, guidance and oversight to CALS teaching programs as well as to the instructional development. This speaks to what we teach, how we teach, how we can improve both, and most importantly, to how our students learn. This is an important committee that needs committed and insightful members. I would be honored to serve CALS in this role and am asking for your consideration.

University Appeals Panel Committee

University Appeals Panel Committee
Candidate's name Statement of Interest
Natalie Bazarova
Debbie Cherney

I am a Professor in the Department of Animal Science, CALS. I have served on the University Faculty Senate, am a member of the HCEC, and serve on the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee. In CALS, I have served on the Academic Achievement and Petitions Committee, the Academic Human Diversity and Resources Committee, and the committee for support of teaching and learning, among others. I would be honored to serve on the Appeals Committee, helping to make a great faculty more great, assisting to ensure that all our faculty a fair promotion decision.

Phillip Griffith
Olga Padilla-Zakour

I believe my professional development at Cornell, from a Sr. Extension Associate starting position to Professor, and the added experience as Associate Chair (2010-2014) and Chair of the Department of Food Science (2014 to 2019) has provided me with a comprehensive view of the challenges and expectations that our faculty members may face. I look forward to working with colleagues to ensure fairness and transparency in the appeal process.

Susan Quirk