The American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program (AIISP) provides a unique combination of American Indian and Indigenous Studies (AIIS) courses, student leadership opportunities and an undergraduate residential experience at Akwe:kon, the first Native student residence hall in North America.

Thousands of bushels of corn

In 1779, President George Washington ordered a scorched earth campaign against the Haudenosaunee Confederacy. The campaign destroyed vast quantities of vegetables, forty towns, and thousands of bushels of corn. This genocide displaced several Haudenosaunee communities, including the Cayuga Nation, from their homelands surrounding Cayuga Lake. Two hundred and fifty years later, the Cayuga return.

Waylon Wilson is a citizen of the Tuscarora Nation and an AIISP graduate student focused on re-storying Indigenous history and issues in multiple media platforms. As a digital media artist, he is relocating Indigenous place-based knowledge as mobile, virtual environments, laser-cut fabrications, and quirky animations. He builds interactive, intergenerational digital spaces for elder and youth play. His current research interests examine the intersections of Indigenous storytelling, documentary filmmaking, cinema techniques, and video game strategies.

Waylon would like to extend a special thank you to Professor Jolene Rickard (Ska:rù:rę'/Tuscarora), Professor John Whitman, Steve Henhawk (Gayogo̱hó꞉nǫ'/ Cayuga), and everyone at AIISP for their continued support of this on-going work!

Image of video game style barrels stretched out as far as you can see which represent bushels of corn

Solidarity with Grief and Anger expressed by Indigenous Communities

The students, faculty, staff, and alumni of the American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program at Cornell University join with Indigenous peoples across Turtle Island to honor and mourn the hundreds of lost Indigenous children whose bodies continue to be found in unmarked and undocumented graves at Canadian Indian Residential Schools.

Photo of pairs of shoes with little lights in between them on a grassy hill.

AIISP Events

This replica of the Hiawatha belt

News

Perry Ground ’91 travels around the world performing traditional Haudenosaunee stories, adapting them to the present while keeping their traditional spirit alive.
  • American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program
A group of people having a discussion.

News

In rural and Indigenous communities with limited access to weather data, generations of farmers, fishers, herders, hunters and orchardists have relied on indicators such as the first snowfall, emergence of a certain plant or arrival of a bird species to guide when to plant, harvest or perform other tasks. But because of climate change, many of these ecological patterns have shifted.
  • American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program
  • Cornell Botanic Gardens
  • Natural Resources and the Environment

AIISP News

This replica of the Hiawatha belt

News

Perry Ground ’91 travels around the world performing traditional Haudenosaunee stories, adapting them to the present while keeping their traditional spirit alive.
  • American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program
A group of people having a discussion.

News

In rural and Indigenous communities with limited access to weather data, generations of farmers, fishers, herders, hunters and orchardists have relied on indicators such as the first snowfall, emergence of a certain plant or arrival of a bird species to guide when to plant, harvest or perform other tasks. But because of climate change, many of these ecological patterns have shifted.
  • American Indian and Indigenous Studies Program
  • Cornell Botanic Gardens
  • Natural Resources and the Environment

Explore the American Indian & Indigenous Studies Program