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Latest news, discoveries & breakthroughs

The Office of Marketing and Communications services CALS faculty, staff and students by providing news and feature coverage of research, teaching and extension and outreach news. We write and edit a wide variety of content for the Cornell Chronicle as well as our college-wide publications, websites and social media platforms.

We coordinate with the Cornell Office of Media Relations to distribute news releases and tip sheets for reporters and other entities. We also assist journalists who request information or interviews of CALS' personnel.

If you are a member of the media seeking to contact a CALS researcher, staff member or student, please contact us at cals-comm [at] cornell.edu (cals-comm[at]cornell[dot]edu).

Latest from the CALS Newsroom

4 individuals standing, smiling with trees in the background

News

Awards A Cornell University team comprising Graduate Student Stephanie Belina won second place at the International Virtual Reality Healthcare Association’s first Healthcare Hackathon Invitational, hosted at Ringling College of Art and Design...
  • Department of Communication
Two women look at a a group of ten tall leafy plants in small pots on a tray.

News

The U.S. National Science Foundation has awarded the Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source $20 million to build a new precision X-ray beamline for research on biological and environmental systems.

  • School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Soil and Crop Sciences Section
  • Plant Biology Section
An oval bacteria with a tail on a purple background.

News

To conduct low-cost and scalable synthetic biological experiments, Cornell researchers have created a new version of a microbe to compete economically with E. coli – a bacteria used to synthesize proteins.

  • Biological and Environmental Engineering
  • Bacteria
Three cows in a barn

News

Research involving animal models – for purposes such as developing new vaccines or regenerative medicines – generally employ mice, but new Cornell research has identified another species that could be valuable in this type of work.

  • Animal Science
  • Genetics
  • Microbiology