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Illustration of a DNA double helix in blue and purple dots

News

Cornell researchers have taken an important step toward harnessing CRISPR gene editing in “targeted, safe and potent” cancer treatment, according to Ailong Ke, professor of chemistry and chemical biology in the College of Arts and Sciences.
  • Molecular Biology and Genetics
White smoke on a black bachground.

News

In a recent study published in Social Science and Medicine, a multidisciplinary team sought to deepen regulators’ understanding of how both adults and teens respond to warning labels on e-cigarettes.

  • Communication
  • Department of Communication
headshot of Karl Czymmek

News

PRO-DAIRY has hired Karl Czymmek for a newly created Dairy Climate Leadership specialist position. Czymmek will have statewide responsibilities in climate leadership and greenhouse gas reduction strategies for the dairy industry, contributing to...
  • Cornell Cooperative Extension
  • PRO-DAIRY
  • Animal Science
AI

News

A multidisciplinary task force of Cornell faculty and staff has issued a report offering perspectives and practical guidelines for the use of generative artificial intelligence in the practice and dissemination of Cornell’s academic research.

  • Department of Communication
  • Communication
Melting ice caps in ocean

Report

Global Development Impact Brief #1 The Global Development Impact Brief series is designed to highlight Global Development’s work across disciplines, issues, and geographies in order to give readers insights into how we are advancing development...
white tailed deer bounding through a field

News

Deer hunters were more likely to be swayed by social media messages about the potential risks of chronic wasting disease if they came from a source they believed aligned with their own views and values.

  • Communication
  • Animals
  • Natural Resources and the Environment
Cornell professor Johannes Lehmann, center, examines the biochar kiln at Spruce Haven Farm with officials from NYSERDA and Arcadis

News

An alumnus-owned farm in Union Springs will become New York’s first commercial dairy to run cow manure through a kiln to make eco-friendly biochar – thanks to Cornell agricultural expertise.

  • School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Department of Global Development
  • Soil and Crop Sciences Section
cyanotype triptych that says "going, going, gone"

News

That concept was the basis for a new course offered for the first time in fall 2023: Using the Power of Food to Confront Climate Change. The one-credit Learning Where You Live course will be offered again this semester . “I think food has power...
  • Climate Change
  • Food
a gloved hand holding a bottle of mpox vaccine

News

Openly gay men were more likely than those who conceal their sexual orientation to seek care for mpox last year during a global outbreak that disproportionately affected their community, researchers from Cornell and the University of Toronto...

  • Department of Communication
  • Communication
  • Behavior
Blackburnian Warbler

News

More than 80% of global land area needed to maintain human well-being and meet biodiversity targets is at risk of conflict with human development, according to a new study led by the Cornell Lab of Ornithology.

  • Animals
  • Lab of Ornithology
  • Nature
School desks in front of white board

News

The project, "School-Based Health Centers - An approach to address health disparities among rural youth” is led by Sharon Tennyson , professor of public policy and economics; Mildred Warner , professor of city and regional planning and global...
  • Department of Global Development
  • Global Development

News

Multimedia

Whirligig beetles – the world’s fastest-swimming insect – achieve surprising speeds by employing a strategy shared by fast-swimming marine mammals and water fowl.

  • Biological and Environmental Engineering
  • Organisms
  • Behavior
Yellow Submarine tomatos in a bowl sitting on top of basil

News

Phillip Griffiths, a Cornell plant breeder, has developed an unusual tomato – with yellow flesh and an oblong shape that prompted its fans to name it “Yellow Submarine.”

  • Cornell AgriTech
  • Cornell University Agricultural Experiment Station
  • School of Integrative Plant Science
Man stands in field

News

Made Adityanandana , a Ph.D. student in development studies whose research examines agrarian transformation and food security, earned the 2024 Ronny Adhikarya Niche Award (RANA) Prize, the Department of Global Development announced today. The...
  • Department of Global Development
  • Global Development
KV Raman speaking at podium

News

  • Plant Breeding and Genetics Section
  • Cornell AgriTech
The sun rising over mountains in Nevada.

News

In the Northeast, December temperatures helped to make 2023 the warmest year on record for 13 of the region’s 35 major urban areas, including New York City, says Cornell’s Northeast Regional Climate Center.

  • Northeast Regional Climate Center
  • Earth and Atmospheric Sciences
  • Cornell Atkinson
a man holds up a bag of cow feed

Field Note

Fabian Gutierrez-Oviedo is originally from Colombia where he completed his Doctor of Veterinary Medicine at the University of Tolima. He joined the Cornell Animal Science Department as a graduate student in Fall 2021. At the Joseph McFadden lab...
  • Animal Science
  • Animals
  • Climate Change
A researcher and a farmer harvest Bt eggplant in Bangladesh

News

  • School of Integrative Plant Science
  • Global Development
  • Department of Global Development
illustration of a cell phone with a person displayed on the screen and their head down

News

Influencers are encouraged to reveal their innermost selves to their followers – to “put themselves out there” – but doing so can result in identity-based harassment, according to research by Brooke Erin Duffy, associate professor of...

  • Department of Communication
  • Behavior
  • Communication
Stephen Jane sits in a boat deploys a sensor in an Adirondack lake

News

Climate warming and lake browning – when dissolved organic matter turns the water tea-brown – are making the bottom of most lakes in the Adirondacks unlivable for cold water species such as trout, salmon and whitefish during the summer.

  • Cornell Atkinson
  • Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
  • Natural Resources and the Environment