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Media Relations

Looking for an expert to speak to food, agriculture, human health, environmental, communication, energy and sustainability issues? Then you've come to the right place.

The College of Agriculture and Life Sciences is home to over 600 faculty members, non-professorial academics, and extension associates who work in the agricultural, biological, physical, and social sciences. Let us know how we can help you by contacting Samara Sit, Assistant Dean for Marketing and Communications, at 607-254-5137 or samara.sit@cornell.edu.


The Latest From CALS Media Relations

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Vietnam Capitalizes on Climate Change with Shrimp

Published: 
Feb 7, 2017
Michael Hoffmann, professor of entomology and a Cornell University’s Atkinson Center for a Sustainable Future Fellow, says Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc’s decision to boost shrimp exports is a smart way to help Vietnam capitalize on climate change. In January, Hoffman led a team of students to Vietnam to study climate change and its implications, not only globally but also how it has impacted the Mekong Delta region of Vietnam, one of the most at risk areas in the world [...] Read more

A Look at the Epic Blizzard of ’77, by the Numbers

Published: 
Jan 26, 2017
Saturday marks the 40th anniversary of the Blizzard of ’77. Jessica Spaccio, a climatologist with the NOAA-funded Northeast Regional Climate Center at Cornell University, looks back at what is considered one of the region’s snowiest seasons on record [...] Read more

Marine disease likely to follow Great Barrier Reef coral bleaching

Published: 
Nov 28, 2016
Drew Harvell, a professor of ecology and evolutionary biology, is widely recognized for her work on marine diseases – specifically, the ecology and evolution of coral resistance to disease as well as evaluating the impacts of a warming climate on coral reef ecosystems. Harvell says the ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies report showing […] Read more

Marine microalgae, a new sustainable food and fuel source

Published: 
Nov 21, 2016
ITHACA, N.Y. – Taken from the bottom of the marine food chain, microalgae may soon become a top-tier contender to combat global warming, as well as energy and food insecurity according to a study published in the journal Oceanography (December 2016). “We may have stumbled onto the next green revolution,” said Charles H. Greene, professor of earth […] Read more